Category Archives: Law and Politics

Good morning and congratulations, President-elect Trump

I note that estimable source of journalism on American politics today, UK’s The Guardian, on the outcome of the US presidential election. Donald Trump shattered expectations on Tuesday with an election night victory that revealed deep anti-establishment anger among American voters and set the world on a journey into the political unknown. Good morning and… Read More »

Florida: Sunshine, Solar Power, and Shenanigans

The Orlando Sun-Sentinel carried an op-ed by Paula Dockery on a deceptive solar power amendment on the November ballot. This should be a must-read article for any Florida voter. Ms. Dockery covers the topic quite well, leaving little for me to say, though I’m going to say some things anyway. The first, and most important,… Read More »

EpiPen Pricing Defended by Shkreli

Martin Shkreli, pharmaceutical patent scavenger, did an interview with CBS and defended Mylan Corp’s inflated pricing of their EpiPen product. “This particular drug is a necessity for some people,” Nair said. “Yeah sure, that’s great – but I think important medicine should be expensive because they’re valuable,” said Martin Shkreli. The former pharmaceutical chief gained… Read More »

The DI Celebrates 20 Years of Gaming the System

The Discovery Institute’s Center for the Renewal of Science and Culture has a post celebrating the 20th anniversary of their first closed, ID-only conference, which led to the book, “Mere Creation”. They spend a chunk of the article saying how they have deployed rhetoric to get things done, another chunk complaining that people actually disagreed… Read More »

Net Neutrality and Irony Meter Implosion

In looking up commentary on net neutrality, I found Kool-Aid chugger Chris Harris. (I was actually looking for “Logan Albright”, and found Harris as an inveterate quoter of Albright.) Amidst a bunch of other hogwash, Harris makes a plea to consider the ISPs: Some dissenters against “Net Neutrality” are most concerned with the free-market implications… Read More »

Net Neutrality and the Contrarian Backlash

Earlier this week, President Barack Obama gave a speech laying out strong support for “net neutrality”. Obama called on the FCC to change classification of broadband internet providers to “common carrier” class, meaning that they would be prohibited from privileging — or blocking — particular sorts of traffic passing through their systems. The backlash was… Read More »

Government Granting Agencies and Wastin’ Time

NPR some time back had an article on scientists leaving science, mostly because government funding of research has become more like a sweepstakes than a well. I had posted a couple of comments in the following thread, and I’d rather those didn’t get lost, as Google seems not to take note of or index comments… Read More »

Toyota, WSJ, and Computers: An Update

Back in 2010, I wrote about the sudden unintended acceleration problem (SUAP in the earlier article here, UA in the source I’m about to link) in various Toyota vehicles. Drivers would find their cars accelerating out of their control and braking was unresponsive. People died. Survivors spoke of their unsuccessful attempts to get their car… Read More »

Church Youth Groups and Apologetics

Over on Facebook, Nancy Pearcey responded to a post about young people and deconversion from churches with a modest proposal: let them read apologetics. Age at which people leave the church — Tell me again why youth groups focus on games and goodies instead of majoring on apologetics? One study found that the age at… Read More »

“Cosmos” and the Bruno Flap

Neil deGrasse Tyson’s rebooted “Cosmos” series spent a chunk of time relating a version of the life of Giordano Bruno, including his interactions with the Inquisition of the Roman Catholic Church and subsequent burning at the stake. This has proven unpopular with the heirs of the Inquisition and other nit-pickers. From the Discovery Institute’s “Evolution… Read More »